Idioms and Phrasal Verbs to talk about Family

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Hey guys!

Everybody knows the importance of learning some phrasal verbs, idioms and colloquial expressions, especially when you live in a foreign country. We always learn a lot of them by communicating with native speakers or watching movies and series. In this post, you learn some phrasal verbs, idioms and expressions to communicate in a more natural way when speaking English in a foreign country.

* your own flesh and blood – a person or people that you are related to.

Of course I care about her well-being, my sister is my flesh and blood after all.

* fight like cat and dog – when two or more people often have angry fights.

The married couple fought like cat and dog the entire time they were together.

* there’s little / no love lost between them – when people don’t like each other.

Bob and Jill cannot get along together. There is no love lost between them.

 * close ranks – when people join together to protect themselves, especially when they are being criticized.

In the past, the party would have closed ranks around its leader and defended him loyally.

* turn on sb – to attack sb suddenly and unexpectedly.

Suddenly she just turned on me and accused me of undermining her.

* as miserable as sin – used to emphasize sb who is very unhappy or depressed.

Everyone just stood around looking miserable as sin during the ceremony.

* take sb for granted – to be so accostomed to sb that you don’t appreciate them.

One of the problems with relationships is that after a while you just take each other for granted.

* put sb on a pedestal – to admire sb so much that you don’t see their faults.

We tend to put our parents and children on a pedestal.

* back sb / sth up – to support sb/sth.

She’s backed up by her parents whenever she needs.

* distance yourself from sb – to become less involved or connected with sb.

My cousins distanced themself from our family after they got married.

I hope you learned some new idioms today, see you next time!

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