Idioms and Phrasal Verbs to talk about humour

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Hey guys!

Everybody knows the importance of learning some phrasal verbs, idioms and colloquial expressions, especially when you live in a foreign country. We always learn a lot of them by communicating with native speakers or watching movies and series. In this post, you learn some phrasal verbs, idioms and expressions to communicate in a more natural way when speaking English in a foreign country.

* pull sb’s leg / have sb on – tell sb sth that is not true, as a joke.

I panicked when he said the test was tomorrow, but then I realized he was just pulling my leg / having me on.

* play a practical joke on sb – play a trick which is intended to surprise or make sb look silly.

She glued her boss’s cup and saucer together as a practical joke.

* say sth with tongue in cheek – not being serious and mean it as a joke.

He said that he was a huge fan of the president, although I suspect it was tongue in cheek.

* laugh your head off / be in stiches – laugh loudly and for a long time.

You laughed your head off / were in stiches when I fell!

* have a good laugh (about sth) – find sth very funny and amusing.

We’ve both had a good laugh about the situation despite what’s happened.

* fall flat – if a joke falls plat nobody laughs at it.

He made several jokes and each of them fell flat.

* be/get/go beyond a joke – become annoying or worrying.

I don’t mind helping her out occasionally, but this is getting beyond a joke.

* no laughing matter – sth which is too serious to make jokes about.

Being late for a job interview is no laughing matter.

I hope you learned some new phrasal verbs and idioms today, see you next time!

Source: Idioms and Phrasal Verbs – Advanced / Ruth Gairns and Stuart Redman – Oxford

Image credits: Designed by macrovector / Freepik

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